Beginning the Chondrosarcoma Journey

Beginning the Chondrosarcoma Journey

Tuesday

What are the long term physical effects of Chondrosarcoma Treatment?

Sometimes chondrosarcoma grows near nerves or tendons and press on them. Surgical removal of the tumor is imperative so damage won't occur to the nearby structures.Due to the necessity of complete removal of chondrosarcoma to prevent metastasis a large amount of body tissue may be affected, including possible partial amputation. Improvements in proper medical care for chondrosarcoma patients often include limb-sparing techniques which may prevent such outcomes. Other possible long term effects of chondrosarcoma are:
Healing and Recovery
A return to as good health

Pain
Scars
Deformity
Nerve damage
Early onset of Degenerative Osteoarthritis
Bio-mechanical and musculoskeletal problems
Depression
Post Traumatic Syndrome

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

I had surgery 4 months ago with stage one chondrosarcoma in my spine in one of the vertebrae. It has been long four months of pain depression extreme anxiety. I wish some one can tell me how long theses symptoms are going to last.

Elizabeth Munroz said...

Thank you for your comment. I'm sorry you have had to undergo all this. But, glad to know you are past the surgery now and on your way to recovery. I can't answer your question with any more clarity than the doctor can. I don't think there is a specific answer. Someone else might have the very same surgery for a chondrosarcoma tumor in the very same location, but the two of you might have very different experiences. There are so many factors to consider. The original condition of health, age, whether or not there are other medical conditions that might affect pain and healing, for example. Recovery for the damage done to your spine might be similar to recovery for someone who has had an injury to their spine. One of the most important things you can do to help yourself is learn as much as you can, and get into some kind of physical therapy. Even if there is little you can do, a little bit is more helpful than none at all. Plus you will have someone who can recognize how your body is handling it. We often expect the doctor to know all this stuff, but we need to remember that spinal surgery is the specialty, not physical therapy. Also, take a good look at what you are doing to treat your pain. Are you gritting your teeth and bearing it, or are you taking medications ordered to help alleviate the pain? Are you resting when tired? Are you recognizing what brings on the pain stronger? Do you use heating pads, ice packs, massage, soaking in a hot tub of water? Learn what you can about back injury and pain control. I hope, too that you consider the depression and how to help yourself there. Depression hits cancer patients at a very high rate. So, it is important for us to pay attention to it and if necessary, seek counseling discuss with a doctor about the possibility of using an antidepressant medication. Please keep in mind that I'm not a doctor. Just a patient who has been through this. So, my ideas are just suggestions. Check with your family physician and see what else he or she might recommend. Hope you will see more improvement soon!

chinmay said...

i am 19 and having this in femue near knee..stage 1..had surgery after radiation but still ..pain is the painest feature i acquired...scored nearly perfect score in SAT but cant join the college cause of my luck.....depression is another third class property i acquired in addition to that my so caring parents who are in this trouble cause of me...feel like shit

Elizabeth Munroz said...

Hello Chinmay, It is important to tell your medical care person about your pain. I am sorry to learn that you cannot join the college. I hope your luck will change soon. Who knows what the future will be? When you look back on this time, you will see that things worked out for the best. Depression is a serious problem. I had very bad depression. It is important to get help from a qualified person as soon as possible. Please do this right away. I know how you feel. I have felt this way in the past. You have to remind yourself that you are a good human being and you deserve to feel better.

MollyMae said...

Hi, I am a 32 year old female and just recently had surgery to remove a tumor in my right femur bone, near my knee. I was experiencing alot of pain prior to surgery and now I am happy to say I am having very little. I was very fortunate to not have to have radiation or chemo because my tumor was low grade cancer. I currently go to physical therapy 3 times a week to try and rebuild muscle and to gain flexion in my knee again. I feel I have been very fortunate thus far and pray my healing will be a speedy one. I wish everyone experiencing something similar good health! Thank you for your post.

Elizabeth Munroz said...

So glad to know you are doing so well! Just remember to go to your follow up appointments no matter how well you are doing. My best to you!

Anonymous said...

My mother had a biopsy done to confirme her tumor is chondrosarcoma we still don't know what stage. Is on the skull base and we are told only radiation is use to treat it. It can't not be taken out due to the location. Any more information you have to offer? Thanks to your site I have a set of question for the oncologist

Elizabeth Munroz said...

If it is not safe to surgically remove the tumor, then Proton Beam radiation is used. It's a very specialized type of radiation and only located in about six places in the US and a few other places in the world. But it is quite effective. It is not usually used for chondrosarcoma in other parts of the body.

Carol Hayes said...

I am a 45 year old female veteran who served in Iraq. I just recently was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma in my ribcage. I have had parts of three ribs and surrounding tissue removed. I had no pain at all when diagnosed...it was discovered on accident. Since the removal of my ribs, the pain is intense. I am over six months post surgery, and have gone in several times to have my chest cavity drained to remove fluid. Recently, I went back to dr complaining of intense pain, and through an CAT/MRI scan, they discovered that the remaining rib had cracked, became infected and then calloused over. But no treatment is being given. Is this right? Even if the infection is no longer active because it is calloused over...shouldnt they do something other then give me oxy? Please help. Cancer is a scary thing. Having to deal with this on top of PTSD from the war is about more then I can handle.

Elizabeth Munroz said...

Carol, I'm sorry to learn you are having these issues. Chronic severe pain is nothing to be ignored. Opiates are not the only answer. If you have underlying infection going on, of course, not only does it need to be treated, but verified that it is gone. Scar tissue on the ribs may not necessarily need treatment. I do hope that follow up scans are continuing though, to prove that there is nothing new going on with the "scarring". Working on your PTSD issues, I know, is an ongoing thing. Feeling like one's life is threatened by the possibility of chondrosarcoma recurrence is bad enough, but what you are dealing with surely complicates it. I do hope that you continue to work on healing and find some peace of mind, day by day, moment by moment I hope healing happens for you.